Nursing school alumni commission sculpture to honor profession

posted on April 24, 2014

 

Model of the Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing commemorative clay sculpture.

Clay model of the Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing commemorative bronze sculpture to be placed on the grounds of the new Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center.

Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing grads launch fundraising campaign

By Deloras Jones, RN, MS
Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing
Alumni Association
Board member

Sidney Garfield, MD, Kaiser Permanente’s co-founder with Henry J. Kaiser, had a vision for health care. A key component of his dream was high-quality care and the requisite excellent education and training for the physicians and nurses who would take care of the health plan’s patients.

Garfield articulated his hopes for the future in the “Second Annual Report of the Permanente Foundation Hospital,” 1945:

We have mentioned previously our conviction that teaching and training is essential to quality maintenance.

We are planning an accredited school of nursing which will be free from the traditional pressure of economics on nursing education, and permit proper emphasis and time in the purely medical aspect of instruction, carrying this on to nursing specialization in the various fields and medical care on a parallel with resident physician training in medicine.

In line with Garfield’s vision: The Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing opened its doors in 1947 at the Oakland hospital offering a three-year diploma program. Over the decades, strong leadership and high academic standards earned the school a reputation as an exemplary institution.

The school was noted for its recruitment of students that represented the diversity of the community – this set it apart from most others at that time in California.

From the beginning, students took general education and science courses at nearby College of Holy Names in Oakland and Contra Costa College in El Sobrante; this allowed them to earn credits that were transferable to a four-year college where they could pursue higher degrees.

KFSN students participated in clinical rotation programs in rehabilitation, community, and rural health.  In the 1960s and 1970s, the school’s California licensing board examination scores were consistently in the top three in the state.

In 1976, the school graduated its last class, as the Board of Trustees was unsuccessful in developing a partnership with a four-year college to offer a baccalaureate degree in nursing.  Over a period of 30 years, 1,065 nurses were educated at the school of nursing.

Oakland Medical Center’s rich history to be told

The 2014 opening of the new Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center is a unique opportunity to commemorate the Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing’s contribution to the heritage of Kaiser Permanente.

Medical center planners have set aside space in the main corridor of the new specialty medical office building for the recounting of Oakland Kaiser Permanente’s history. The Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing Alumni Association has collaborated with medical center officials and the Kaiser Permanente Heritage Resources staff to develop a portion of the display to recognize the school of nursing.

Additionally, the alumni association plans to raise funds to pay for a life-size bronze sculpture of a student nurse. The statue will be given to the Oakland Medical Center, which was the home of the nursing school.

The sculpture will be placed in a prominent location on the new Oakland campus, serving as a monument to the legacy of the Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing and to honor the nursing profession as a whole.

The likeness of the nurse with a child will remind passers-by of the essential contribution nurses make to the health of the community and the care they provide to all patients.

Sculpture fundraising project under way

The alumni association has launched a $100,000 fundraising campaign to commission the sculpture.  Staff, friends, and colleagues are invited to contribute to this commemoration of the school of nursing and recognition of the nursing profession.

Community Initiatives, a not-for-profit organization, serves as the 501(c) (3) fiscal sponsor for the KFSNAA; thus, contributions to the sculpture are tax-exempt.

Deloras Jones, board member and Heritage Project Director of the Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing Alumni Association

Deloras Jones, board member and Heritage Project director of the Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing Alumni Association

Please make donation checks out toNursing Education Heritage Project/CI. 

Mail to:
Nursing Education Heritage Project/Community Initiatives

354 Pine Street, Suite 700
San Francisco, CA 94104

Scholarships for nursing students

The nursing school alumni association’s mission also includes promoting professional nursing careers and the advancement of the profession through scholarships for nursing education.

Editor’s note: Deloras Jones, RN, MS, retired Kaiser Permanente nursing leader, is a member of the Kaiser Foundation School of Nursing Alumni Association Board and serves as the association’s Heritage Project director. She graduated from the school with the Class of 1963.

Clair Lisker, RN, MSc, retired Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center nursing administrator, longtime nursing school faculty member and graduate of the Class of 1951, provided historical information for this article.

 

 http://bit.ly/1hqlz6C

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Kaiser On-the-Job: Streamlining Workers’ Compensation Care

posted on April 22, 2014

Lincoln Cushing
Heritage writer

Previous part: “Injured on the job! The history of Kaiser Workers’ Compensation care

Beginning with Dr. Sidney Garfield’s pioneering developments in occupational medicine in the 1930s, and Henry J. Kaiser’s expansion of that care for thousands of workers in his seven West Coast shipyards and Fontana steel mill, further advances in programs for handling worker health care evolved as did labor in America.

After the end of World War II, the composition of the national workforce bagan to shift from blue-collar to white-collar occupations, and the percentage of the Kaiser Permanente Health Plan devoted to industrial care waned. Still, in 1967 over a fifth of the Permanente Medical Group’s (the entity of the KP Health Plan that represents doctors) income was derived from industrial medicine.[i]

Yet a prejudice about this sphere of medicine had grown where many doctors had become cynical about both employee and employer versions of injury. As PMG Director Dr. Cecil Cutting ruefully commented, “…we practice Industrial Medicine in a manner which ranges from half-hearted to reluctant, reserving our active interest and most attentive effort for the care of Health Plan patients.”

"New Occupational Medicine Clinic" Planning for Health, Santa Clara Valley edition, Winter 1994

“New Occupational Medicine Clinic” Planning for Health, Santa Clara Valley edition, Winter 1994

KP developed a bad reputation among insurers as being uncooperative in processing the admittedly large amount of paperwork required for industrial claims. Dr. Cutting found this unacceptable, and sought to overhaul and invigorate its industrial medicine practice. He hired the respected and experienced Dr. Walter Hook to oversee the creation of Departments of Industrial Medicine at all major medical centers, each headed by a Chief.

The efforts paid off, and in less than two years the number of industrial patients grew from 21,257 to approximately 33,892.[ii] These departments were not clinical services, but handled the reporting and billing functions required to process workers’ compensation claims.

 
Kaiser On-the-Job

During the 1980s California employers saw dramatic workers’ compensation cost increases. The workers’ compensation system quadrupled in size between 1983 and 1993, from $2.5 billion to $11 billion, and efforts were made to contain costs and streamline services.

KOJ-NW clip

Still from video story on KP Northwest KOJ, 1996.
Click on image to see video.

Kaiser Permanente responded with a program called “Kaiser On-the-Job” (KOJ), first started in the Northwest Region in 1991. The program was implemented with the goals of meeting employer needs to decrease employee time lost from work and to help reduce health costs related to workplace injuries. KOJ now covers more than 300,000 workers in the NW Region’s service area.

To achieve optimal patient outcomes, it incorporated prevention, case management, clinical protocols, and return to work programs with impressive results. Between 1990 and 1994, the NW Region reduced average loss time per claim by more than two days and achieved a cost savings of $666 in average cost per claim.

The program was so successful that it received the Northwest Region’s 1996 James A. Vohs Award for Quality.[iii] Soon afterward, the Hawaii Region started opening KOJ clinics on the islands of Oahu, Maui and Hawaii.

This approach was soon adopted in other KP settings. Dr. Doug Benner, Coordinator of Regional Occupational Health Services at the time, remarked: “We had a system that just wasn’t working for employers, and wasn’t working for our physicians and staff either…This model goes a long way toward fulfilling our members’ expectations for access and service.”[iv]

Kaiser On-The-Job brochure graphic, 2012

Kaiser On-The-Job brochure graphic, 2012

KOJ later expanded to California in 1993 when Northern California started building dedicated occupational health centers integrated with our KP program, eventually opening 30 KOJ centers.

In January, 1993 the first of the new KP “one-stop” occupational health clinics opened at the Bayhill Medical Offices in San Bruno. A network of occupational health clinics were fully equipped and staffed with physicians, nurses, and physical therapists specialized in treating work-related injuries. Whereas injured workers frequently used KP’s regional emergency rooms as a first resort, they are now directed by their employers to seek care at the Occupational Health Centers.  

Kaiser On-the-Job occupational clinics in the Northwest region were featured in KP’s Perspectives video magazine, promoting the innovative provision of ”comprehensive array of services for the workplace.”

Four KP Divisions (Northwest, Northern California, Southern California, and Hawaii) now operate KOJ programs that share many of the same clinical guidelines, care philosophies and processes, and – most important – the same commitment to integrated managed care.[v]

Work will always pose hazards. But the treatment of injuries on the job, which was the spark that in 1933 led to the eventual formation of Kaiser Permanente, continues to be one of the many ways that this health care organization serves this nation’s working people.

 

Short link to this story: http://bit.ly/1i7dUup


Special thanks to Dr. Doug Benner, Coordinator of Regional Occupational Medicine Services (1993 to 2011) and Connie Chiulli (Director of Operations, Occupational Health Service Line, Regional Occupational Health, TPMG) for help with this article.

[i] Newsletter from the desk of the Executive PMG Director, June, 1967.

[ii] Newsletter from the desk of the Executive PMG Director, March 1970.

[iii] <http://kpnet.kp.org/qrrm/perf_imp/vohs2/winners/winspast_desc.htm>

[iv] “Designated Occupational Medicine Services: New Model of Care for Injured Workers, Opening Soon Everywhere,” Contact, 12/1993.

[v] http://xnet.kp.org/permanentejournal/fall98pj/works.html

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Earth Day – Awakening an environmental citizenry

posted on April 21, 2014
"Aerial photographs during the strike" Kaiser Steel, Fontana 1972

Cover of “Aerial photographs during the strike” published by Kaiser Steel, Fontana 1972

Lincoln Cushing
Heritage writer

The first national “Earth Day” on April 22, 1970 was an indicator of increased national environmental consciousness, and community relations with the Kaiser steel mill in Fontana, Calif. had grown tense. The wartime facility had fired up its first blast furnace, “Bess No. 1” (named after Kaiser’s wife), on December 30, 1942, and boasted numerous technologies to reduce air and water pollution. Yet smog was invading the formerly pristine remote rural community, and many fingers pointed toward the mill.

In February 1972 the United Steelworkers of America Local No. 2869 started a 43-day strike that shut down the sprawling facility. Taking to heart Henry J. Kaiser’s famous proclamation that “Problems are only opportunities in work clothes,” management saw the situation as a way to help dispel the persistent criticisms. They embarked on a project to document Fontana’s skies when the “variable” of an operating steel mill was absent. An independent series of aerial photos – some with filthy air, some without – provided evidence that east-blowing Los Angeles basin smog might be the culprit.

Read the full story here.

Short link to this story: http://bit.ly/1kUnEIW

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The Silverbow sails for Oahu

posted on April 17, 2014
14_0417_01-sm

SS Permanente Silverbow sailing out of the San Francisco Bay, April 17, 1950.

Henry J. Kaiser’s Permanente Cement works had just begun operations in 1939 when he learned that the U.S. Navy wanted to improve on deliveries of cement to Hawaii.

Kaiser claimed he could cut loading and unloading times by as much as 80 percent by pumping bulk, dry cement from ship holds into storage silos in Honolulu. Cynics said the cement would be ruined, but Kaiser guaranteed the product “…from our San Jose plant to the wheelbarrow in Hawaii.”

In October 1940, Kaiser & Co. purchased an aging freighter (the SS Ancon) from the Panama Canal Company and converted it to a bulk cement carrier. The ship went into service as the SS Permanente in March 1941 under contract with the U.S. Navy.

The SS Permanente was moored at Pearl Harbor when it was bombed by the Japanese on December 7, 1941. The ship was not damaged and had already offloaded its holds when the attack came. Within a few days the silos holding the offloaded cement were emptied for the emergency rebuild of the harbor.

By 1945 there were newer, faster, surplus freighters available, and the old SS Permanente was scrapped.

Two years later the Permanente Cement Company purchased a Victory-class cargo ship that had entered service in 1944, the SS Silverbow Victory. When this ship was refitted to carry cement, she was given the name, the SS Permanente Silverbow. She bore cement to the isles until Kaiser built a cement plant on Oahu in the 1950s.

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