Franklin D. Roosevelt’s passing mourned at Kaiser shipyard

posted on October 14, 2014

Lincoln Cushing
Heritage writer

On April 12, 1945, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt suffered a stroke and died while on a vacation in

Franklin D. Roosevelt's horse-drawn casket proceeds down Pennsylvania Avenue during his funeral procession, 4/14/1945. Photo courtesy Library of Congress. Click on arrow to play audio.

Franklin D. Roosevelt’s horse-drawn casket proceeds down Pennsylvania Avenue during his funeral procession, 4/14/1945. Photo courtesy Library of Congress. Click on arrow to play audio.

Warm Springs, Georgia.

Two days later, the S.S. Bradford Island, a tanker, was launched from the Kaiser Swan Island (Portland, Ore.) shipyard before a somber audience.

A bugler mournfully played taps. The master of ceremonies asked the shipyard flag be lowered to half-staff, then he delivered a brief elegy to the popular fallen president.

Roosevelt had visited the Vancouver (Wash.) Kaiser shipyard on September 23, 1942 on a secret trip to review Home Front production, and was a strong supporter of the Kaiser shipyards and workers.

This audio clip comes to us from an archival set of master recordings on glass disks, capturing the gravity and loss of a community that had suffered much in the past years:

“By the proclamation of Harry S. Truman, president of the United States, this is a day of national mourning for the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt…

“We have lost a great leader and a true friend. We mourn with the other people of the world who have also sustained this loss…

“There is perhaps a no more fitting way to commemorate his passing from us as a mortal being than the launching of this ship. For although death has come to Mr. Roosevelt, it came near the hour of victory towards which he led us, and the sturdiness of his dauntless spirit and faith is with us.”

 

Short link to this article: http://bit.ly/1wA8jAR

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

We cannot accept comments from users under the age of 13. Please do not include any medical, personal or confidential information in your comment. Conversation is strongly encouraged; however, Kaiser Permanente reserves the right to moderate comments on this blog as necessary to prevent medical, personal and confidential information from being posted on this site. In addition, Kaiser Permanente will remove all spam, personal attacks, profanity, and off topic commentary. Finally, we reserve the right to change the posting guidelines at any time, at our sole discretion.